Malachi's Promise "And he shall turn the heart of the fathers to the children, and the heart of the children to the fathers...." Malachi 4:6

Sunday, April 11, 2010

Genealogical Concept Map

Here's one more form I use: a Genealogical Concept Map. It is one of my favorites.

At a glance I have quite a lot of helpful information. I put the ancestor's name in pen and add other information in pencil so it can be corrected or added to as I find more definitive sources. This form, combined with the
Checklist for Completed Searches that I posted a few days ago or an updated one at Me and My Ancestors, gives a concise overview of what I need to know when I'm researching -- and space to add more information I have or might need for a research trip.

It doesn't have sources on it because I use this in conjunction with my research log where I keep a detailed record of where I've searched and what I've found (or, in so many cases, haven't found).

I found this years ago when I was thinking about doing my family history and I thought it might be helpful and copied it. Unfortunately I didn't note where I found it. If any readers know its source, please let me know and I'll remove it if it violates copyright or give credit if permission is given by the creator to leave it here.

12 comments:

  1. Thank you for posting these. I keep my own checklists, which I tailor to different eras and locations, but I like the visual organization. I've noticed that for large families it is very difficult to make sure that I've covered all the bases, and I think thee will help me.

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  2. In my world, chaos seems apparent -- I am a "jump in and swim around until I make sense of ?? whatever"-type of person. It works (well pretty well) for me --- but I find that when I am really stumped I have to to go to my more organized friends. Thanks for this tool.

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  3. Greta, you're welcome. I hope one of them works for you.

    Joan, you make me laugh. Hey, if chaos works, why change! I hope you don't get stumped, but if you do, I hope the form helps.

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  4. Nancy,
    I'm going to have to try this one also! Thanks for sharing!

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  5. I'm here from Grandma's Stitches. Thank you for this research form. I've loved the posts I've read tonight, and I'll be back again to explore.

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  6. Mary, I hope it proves useful to you.

    Travelin'Oma, I'm glad you stopped by. I love comments! Thanks.

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  7. What a great chart! Thanks for sharing!

    I tend to be pretty random, but I'm at the point now that I need to be more organized. This is perfect :)

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  8. Nancy, I've never seen this kind of form before. I like it! ...and honestly, I think this one beats the one with boxes. The circles let the eye move around the page at random instead of marching from box to box. (Yeah, that's me, ricocheting from place to place like a pinball... hahaha!)

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  9. T.K., I'm with you on the "artistic" aspect of the circles, that is, how the eye moves across the page. The boxes are much too regimented and, in my opinion, not at all artistic.

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  10. I've never seen this type of form either. Love it! Wish I'd had it when I first started this "hobby" 30 years ago. Certainly would've prevented many false starts and wrong turns. One modification I'd make, tho, is to color-code spouse to his/her children in the case of multiple marriages.

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  11. JamaGenie, that's a great idea. It could be done easily by writing the names in color or by going around the inside of the circle with color, or probably other ways. Great idea! Thanks for visiting my blog.

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  12. Nancy, you are so form-savvy, I need your input. I've got names from Gessner to Rubenstein in my chart, but they're easy! We're all stumped by John Wilson who married Annie Wallace. There were so many of both! I need a form to compare all the John Wilsons in 19th century Alabama, for example, so I can get some clue which one might have been ours. I need to spread something out and see if I can trace a continuity. Something like census extracts in a spreadsheet might work ... do you have any ideas? Thanks! Joël

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I appreciate your comments and look forward to reading what you have to say. Thanks for stopping by.

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